Author Topic: building a 1973 Collegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.  (Read 952 times)

Offline GarySchwinn

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Its a campus green 73 Collegiate 5 speed.  There is no front wheel, and the back wheel is very rusty..  I would like to put 2" urban tires on it. What are some alloy wheels that would work?  I need to know how to take the freewheel off and put it on the new wheel (that I dont have yet). What hub thread am I looking for?  I would like to stick with 26" wheels.   Thanks.
1972 Continental, Kool Lemon, 24"

Offline rickpaulos

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2023, 01:09:04 AM »
Hubs are threaded in English threading spec.  No chance it is Italian or French, the other 2 rare standards.  Many Schwinn Approved freewheels and hubs were made by French companies but they used English specs for Schwinn orders.

There are about 20 different freewheel remover sizes and patterns.  The brand is usually on the face ring.  and some brands have different models.  Most older schwinns used Atom (small spline) or Maillard (large spline) freewheels. Schwinn also got Shimano freewheels from Japan in the 1970s that used a small spline (different from the Atom).  Most of the freewheel removers are around $10 but some are much rarer and quite expensive. A local bike shop can take it off for a few bucks.  They just hand thread on.

The oem front wheel surely has a 5/16" axle.  Most modern bikes use 10 mm axles (about 3/8").  The 1973s should have keyhole fork ends and use special conical washers as safety retention devices and to center the hub in the fork.  You can file out the fork ends so a newer larger axle will fit but it will be a sloppy fit and make it harder to get the wheel centered when installed.  When I do wheel swaps on this style of fork I keep the original hub and spoke in a newer aluminum rim. The flat blade forks will take wider tires. 

The rear spacing on a 5 speed collegiate should be 120 or  121 mm.  Back wheels are sold to fit all sizes.  Newer bikes have more gears so the rear end of the frame is wider.  Best to match it up rather than trying to force fit a wrong width wheel.  If you have a wider wheel, usually axle spacers can be redone to make it 120 mm, then redish the wheel to keep the rim centered and the bike tracking straight.

Most new wheels are 26 x 1.x (bsd of 559) vs the stock 26 x 1 3/8 to fit Schwinn S-6 rims (bsd 597)  That's 597 - 559 = 38 mm smaller for new rims.  The rim brakes will probably need to be replaced with longer reach calipers.  You can get them up to 108.0 mm long (4 inches).  Using smaller rims put the tire farther away from the narrowest part of the frame & fork so you can fit wider tires.  All advertised tire widths are not accurate.  One company's 2" tire will be wider/narrower than others.  It really takes some trial and error to fit the widest tire a frame can handle. Knobs on mtb tires stick out more and are more likely to catch on the frame or fenders.

Another option is 650b rims & tires.  those have a bsd of 584 which may allow you to keep the stock brakes.  650b is also known as 27.5 and there are many tires available in all widths and tread patterns.  Finding 36 spoke hole 650b rims may be difficult.  Most new wheels have 32 spokes.

The oem rims 26 x 1 3/8 to fit s-6 have no other tire width options.

I often use wheel parts from box mart bikes when converting old Schwinns.  The bso steel hubs are terrible so I don't use those. Made of sheet metal, cups stamped sheet metal and painted and painted cones, rarely greased at the factory and never adjusted correctly so they are worn out in just a few hundred miles. Paint just isn't a good lubricant.  Most Schwinn Approved hubs are far better.  IMO, the French made Schwinn Approved hubs have harder cups and don't wear out nearly as fast as the Schwinn Approved Made in Japan hubs.   Some brands of box mart aluminum rims are "acceptable" so I'll reuse those.  Silver spokes (no rust) are reuseable as well.  Black spokes are mostly pretty bad.  Box mart mountain bikes are essentially free so harvesting rims from them is low cost.  I've done over 50 single speed conversions. I've dumped the oem Schwinn steel rims on almost all of them.  Aluminum rims really improve the ride quality and braking of these old bikes.



"We shows girls love on Valentine's Day, and they let us blow things up on the Fourth of July. I just pray they never fall on the same day."  HS.

A:jan B:feb C:mar D:apr E:may F:jun G:jul H:aug J:sep K:oct L:nov M:dec
A65 B66 C67 D68 E69 F70 G71 H72 J73 K74 L75 M76 N77 P78 Q79 R80 S81 T82 U83 V84

Offline JenniferC

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2023, 12:03:44 PM »
There have been members here that have fitted 700c wheels onto the Collegiate without too much trouble. 700c is 622 BCD and the Collegiate wheel is 597 BCD. There is also the the 26 1 3/8 590 BCD option. That keeps the wheel size pretty close to the original size.

700c on Collegiate

https://www.schwinnbikeforum.com/index.php?topic=3452.msg12696#msg12696

Search eBay 26 1 3/8 alloy wheel.
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2334524.m570.l1313&_nkw=26+1+3%2F8+alloy+wheel&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&_odkw=26+1+3%2F8+wheels&_osacat=0



Offline GarySchwinn

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2023, 04:54:59 PM »
what is BSD?  and BSO?


There have been members here that have fitted 700c wheels onto the Collegiate without too much trouble. 700c is 622 BCD and the Collegiate wheel is 597 BCD. There is also the the 26 1 3/8 590 BCD option. That keeps the wheel size pretty close to the original size.

700c on Collegiate

https://www.schwinnbikeforum.com/index.php?topic=3452.msg12696#msg12696

Search eBay 26 1 3/8 alloy wheel.
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2334524.m570.l1313&_nkw=26+1+3%2F8+alloy+wheel&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&_odkw=26+1+3%2F8+wheels&_osacat=0



Hubs are threaded in English threading spec.  No chance it is Italian or French, the other 2 rare standards.  Many Schwinn Approved freewheels and hubs were made by French companies but they used English specs for Schwinn orders.

There are about 20 different freewheel remover sizes and patterns.  The brand is usually on the face ring.  and some brands have different models.  Most older schwinns used Atom (small spline) or Maillard (large spline) freewheels. Schwinn also got Shimano freewheels from Japan in the 1970s that used a small spline (different from the Atom).  Most of the freewheel removers are around $10 but some are much rarer and quite expensive. A local bike shop can take it off for a few bucks.  They just hand thread on.

The oem front wheel surely has a 5/16" axle.  Most modern bikes use 10 mm axles (about 3/8").  The 1973s should have keyhole fork ends and use special conical washers as safety retention devices and to center the hub in the fork.  You can file out the fork ends so a newer larger axle will fit but it will be a sloppy fit and make it harder to get the wheel centered when installed.  When I do wheel swaps on this style of fork I keep the original hub and spoke in a newer aluminum rim. The flat blade forks will take wider tires. 

The rear spacing on a 5 speed collegiate should be 120 or  121 mm.  Back wheels are sold to fit all sizes.  Newer bikes have more gears so the rear end of the frame is wider.  Best to match it up rather than trying to force fit a wrong width wheel.  If you have a wider wheel, usually axle spacers can be redone to make it 120 mm, then redish the wheel to keep the rim centered and the bike tracking straight.

Most new wheels are 26 x 1.x (bsd of 559) vs the stock 26 x 1 3/8 to fit Schwinn S-6 rims (bsd 597)  That's 597 - 559 = 38 mm smaller for new rims.  The rim brakes will probably need to be replaced with longer reach calipers.  You can get them up to 108.0 mm long (4 inches).  Using smaller rims put the tire farther away from the narrowest part of the frame & fork so you can fit wider tires.  All advertised tire widths are not accurate.  One company's 2" tire will be wider/narrower than others.  It really takes some trial and error to fit the widest tire a frame can handle. Knobs on mtb tires stick out more and are more likely to catch on the frame or fenders.

Another option is 650b rims & tires.  those have a bsd of 584 which may allow you to keep the stock brakes.  650b is also known as 27.5 and there are many tires available in all widths and tread patterns.  Finding 36 spoke hole 650b rims may be difficult.  Most new wheels have 32 spokes.

The oem rims 26 x 1 3/8 to fit s-6 have no other tire width options.

I often use wheel parts from box mart bikes when converting old Schwinns.  The bso steel hubs are terrible so I don't use those. Made of sheet metal, cups stamped sheet metal and painted and painted cones, rarely greased at the factory and never adjusted correctly so they are worn out in just a few hundred miles. Paint just isn't a good lubricant.  Most Schwinn Approved hubs are far better.  IMO, the French made Schwinn Approved hubs have harder cups and don't wear out nearly as fast as the Schwinn Approved Made in Japan hubs.   Some brands of box mart aluminum rims are "acceptable" so I'll reuse those.  Silver spokes (no rust) are reuseable as well.  Black spokes are mostly pretty bad.  Box mart mountain bikes are essentially free so harvesting rims from them is low cost.  I've done over 50 single speed conversions. I've dumped the oem Schwinn steel rims on almost all of them.  Aluminum rims really improve the ride quality and braking of these old bikes.




Hubs are threaded in English threading spec.  No chance it is Italian or French, the other 2 rare standards.  Many Schwinn Approved freewheels and hubs were made by French companies but they used English specs for Schwinn orders.

There are about 20 different freewheel remover sizes and patterns.  The brand is usually on the face ring.  and some brands have different models.  Most older schwinns used Atom (small spline) or Maillard (large spline) freewheels. Schwinn also got Shimano freewheels from Japan in the 1970s that used a small spline (different from the Atom).  Most of the freewheel removers are around $10 but some are much rarer and quite expensive. A local bike shop can take it off for a few bucks.  They just hand thread on.

The oem front wheel surely has a 5/16" axle.  Most modern bikes use 10 mm axles (about 3/8").  The 1973s should have keyhole fork ends and use special conical washers as safety retention devices and to center the hub in the fork.  You can file out the fork ends so a newer larger axle will fit but it will be a sloppy fit and make it harder to get the wheel centered when installed.  When I do wheel swaps on this style of fork I keep the original hub and spoke in a newer aluminum rim. The flat blade forks will take wider tires. 

The rear spacing on a 5 speed collegiate should be 120 or  121 mm.  Back wheels are sold to fit all sizes.  Newer bikes have more gears so the rear end of the frame is wider.  Best to match it up rather than trying to force fit a wrong width wheel.  If you have a wider wheel, usually axle spacers can be redone to make it 120 mm, then redish the wheel to keep the rim centered and the bike tracking straight.

Most new wheels are 26 x 1.x (bsd of 559) vs the stock 26 x 1 3/8 to fit Schwinn S-6 rims (bsd 597)  That's 597 - 559 = 38 mm smaller for new rims.  The rim brakes will probably need to be replaced with longer reach calipers.  You can get them up to 108.0 mm long (4 inches).  Using smaller rims put the tire farther away from the narrowest part of the frame & fork so you can fit wider tires.  All advertised tire widths are not accurate.  One company's 2" tire will be wider/narrower than others.  It really takes some trial and error to fit the widest tire a frame can handle. Knobs on mtb tires stick out more and are more likely to catch on the frame or fenders.

Another option is 650b rims & tires.  those have a bsd of 584 which may allow you to keep the stock brakes.  650b is also known as 27.5 and there are many tires available in all widths and tread patterns.  Finding 36 spoke hole 650b rims may be difficult.  Most new wheels have 32 spokes.

The oem rims 26 x 1 3/8 to fit s-6 have no other tire width options.

I often use wheel parts from box mart bikes when converting old Schwinns.  The bso steel hubs are terrible so I don't use those. Made of sheet metal, cups stamped sheet metal and painted and painted cones, rarely greased at the factory and never adjusted correctly so they are worn out in just a few hundred miles. Paint just isn't a good lubricant.  Most Schwinn Approved hubs are far better.  IMO, the French made Schwinn Approved hubs have harder cups and don't wear out nearly as fast as the Schwinn Approved Made in Japan hubs.   Some brands of box mart aluminum rims are "acceptable" so I'll reuse those.  Silver spokes (no rust) are reuseable as well.  Black spokes are mostly pretty bad.  Box mart mountain bikes are essentially free so harvesting rims from them is low cost.  I've done over 50 single speed conversions. I've dumped the oem Schwinn steel rims on almost all of them.  Aluminum rims really improve the ride quality and braking of these old bikes.




1972 Continental, Kool Lemon, 24"

Offline acg_schwinn

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2023, 05:39:49 PM »
what is BSD?  and BSO?

BSD is the Bead Seat Diameter, the measurement taken across the rim at the point where the tire bead is seated.

BSO is, if I remember right, "Bicycle-Shaped Object," Rick's invented term for cheap department-store bicycles, especially those for kids.

Offline rickpaulos

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2023, 12:54:14 AM »
I did not invent that term. I read it on the www somewhere.  It's a bit more polite than what boxmart bikes should be called. 
"We shows girls love on Valentine's Day, and they let us blow things up on the Fourth of July. I just pray they never fall on the same day."  HS.

A:jan B:feb C:mar D:apr E:may F:jun G:jul H:aug J:sep K:oct L:nov M:dec
A65 B66 C67 D68 E69 F70 G71 H72 J73 K74 L75 M76 N77 P78 Q79 R80 S81 T82 U83 V84

Offline SortaGrey

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2023, 11:24:23 AM »
I am impressed w responses to your q's. Thorough and spot on.

559's.. MTB rims aluminum usually can be found locally or in a bike coop very reasonably. Sourcing longer reach brakes also might be doable at a coop if needed. Not familiar w how those original brakes fit.. I have 'hogged' out brake slots for more reach IF enough metal is present.   
bike
Me.. would not invest the time in this bike. So many cheap lugged steel MTB's around. Sleepers IMO.. invest some $$ in quality tires... you have a good rider. Good tires at the correct PSI is the main ingredient in ride Q.

LOL... one very nice young lady bought similar from me back when... concerned about the wide rubber on those 'narrow' rims. She paid.. I stated bring it back for refund in a week if you then see a concern.

Never.. returned.

Offline GarySchwinn

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2023, 02:50:35 PM »
I am impressed w responses to your q's. Thorough and spot on.

559's.. MTB rims aluminum usually can be found locally or in a bike coop very reasonably. Sourcing longer reach brakes also might be doable at a coop if needed. Not familiar w how those original brakes fit.. I have 'hogged' out brake slots for more reach IF enough metal is present.   
bike
Me.. would not invest the time in this bike. So many cheap lugged steel MTB's around. Sleepers IMO.. invest some $$ in quality tires... you have a good rider. Good tires at the correct PSI is the main ingredient in ride Q.

LOL... one very nice young lady bought similar from me back when... concerned about the wide rubber on those 'narrow' rims. She paid.. I stated bring it back for refund in a week if you then see a concern.

Never.. returned.

I ordered the tires Kenda 838.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/282095719835

and the BMX 1080 brakes.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/194314181479

I would like to put the old 5 speed freewheel on the 559 wheel. I easily removed the freewheel with an FR4 tool.  The 559 wheel which came from a very old Trek 820 I believe has a shimano freewheel on it but I cannot budge it even with the correct tool. FR1.3  There seems to be a retaining ring  on the freewheel but thats to keep the cogs on not to lock the freewheel on the hub right?      I put the tool in the vise , put the wheel on the tool and turned counter clockwise. Is this correct?  Still looking for a truing stand. I like the Bikehand one but I cant find anyone in the US that sells it.
1972 Continental, Kool Lemon, 24"

Offline rickpaulos

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2023, 06:31:03 PM »
You have the freewheel removal process correct.  A couple things can help.
Tire on and inflated.  That makes the wheel larger so you can get more leverage on it.
Wear heavy leather gloves to save your hands.
Get a helper (with gloves).  Two can put in more torque.

Some freewheels are on really tight because the previous owner rode hard up steep hills in low gear.  You are trying to counter their weight and strength with just your arms.  Grrrrr.
"We shows girls love on Valentine's Day, and they let us blow things up on the Fourth of July. I just pray they never fall on the same day."  HS.

A:jan B:feb C:mar D:apr E:may F:jun G:jul H:aug J:sep K:oct L:nov M:dec
A65 B66 C67 D68 E69 F70 G71 H72 J73 K74 L75 M76 N77 P78 Q79 R80 S81 T82 U83 V84

Offline GarySchwinn

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2023, 07:32:28 PM »
You have the freewheel removal process correct.  A couple things can help.
Tire on and inflated.  That makes the wheel larger so you can get more leverage on it.
Wear heavy leather gloves to save your hands.
Get a helper (with gloves).  Two can put in more torque.

Some freewheels are on really tight because the previous owner rode hard up steep hills in low gear.  You are trying to counter their weight and strength with just your arms.  Grrrrr.


Ok I ate a sandwhich, and tried again.  It came off.  I think I was just unsure if I was doing it right and didnt want to force it, especially considering how easily the Schwinn one came off.   Now I have put the Schwinn freewheel on the Trek hub and it threaded on easily.  I plan to overhaul the Schwinn freewheel.   The original shaft has slots in it and special washers.  The new shaft does not have that.  I would like to use the original shaft but Im not sure if the cones on it are compatible with the new hub and bearings.  The new shaft is 10mm and the old shaft is slightly smaller maybe 5/16"?  Naturally the lock nuts and spacers do not interchange.  Also spoke protector interchanged nicely.
1972 Continental, Kool Lemon, 24"

Offline rickpaulos

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2023, 08:12:52 PM »
That's 9.5 mm vs 3/8" axles.  The diameters are nearly identical but the thread pitch is slightly different. The cones and nuts will turn on a couple threads then bind up.   So close but not close enough. Don't force them, they just aren't compatible.

9.5mm x 1mm pitch
3/8 " x 26 tpi

You can replace the entire axle set with the other size in low to mid range roadie hubs but not in coaster brake hubs.

"We shows girls love on Valentine's Day, and they let us blow things up on the Fourth of July. I just pray they never fall on the same day."  HS.

A:jan B:feb C:mar D:apr E:may F:jun G:jul H:aug J:sep K:oct L:nov M:dec
A65 B66 C67 D68 E69 F70 G71 H72 J73 K74 L75 M76 N77 P78 Q79 R80 S81 T82 U83 V84

Offline GarySchwinn

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2023, 08:56:31 PM »
That's 9.5 mm vs 3/8" axles.  The diameters are nearly identical but the thread pitch is slightly different. The cones and nuts will turn on a couple threads then bind up.   So close but not close enough. Don't force them, they just aren't compatible.

9.5mm x 1mm pitch
3/8 " x 26 tpi

You can replace the entire axle set with the other size in low to mid range roadie hubs but not in coaster brake hubs.



Im wanting to use the 3/8 shaft and cones in the hub that came with a 10mm shaft and its own cones. I want to do this so I can use the slotted shaft and non quick release nuts and washers.  Would this work?  I also wish I had a picture of how the spacers and washers are arranged in what order.
1972 Continental, Kool Lemon, 24"

Offline rickpaulos

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Re: building a 1973 Colegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2023, 09:36:39 PM »
Most new hubs don't have slots and keyed washers.  Many don't even have the washers.  Properly tightened, the lock nuts keep the cones in place.  The washers are needed to get the spacing correct to match the frame width.

Cones come in 100+ sizes and shapes.  Axle size, thread pitch, cone length, cone diameter, quality grades, intended ball size, etc.  A too-fat cone will bind up in a small dust shield. A too short of a cone won't stick out far enough to get a cone wrench on it. Some hubs have the dust shield pressed into the hub shell while others have the dust shield press fitted to the cone.  There are far to many combos of hub brands/models and axle specs so trial and error is the only method to see if they fit.



"We shows girls love on Valentine's Day, and they let us blow things up on the Fourth of July. I just pray they never fall on the same day."  HS.

A:jan B:feb C:mar D:apr E:may F:jun G:jul H:aug J:sep K:oct L:nov M:dec
A65 B66 C67 D68 E69 F70 G71 H72 J73 K74 L75 M76 N77 P78 Q79 R80 S81 T82 U83 V84

Offline Gracie

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Re: building a 1973 Collegiate. Help me decide on wheels please.
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2023, 01:00:54 AM »
I am restoring a '77 Collegiate, and have some questions regarding fender and wheel design.

Always the appearance of the fender to wheel interference seems skewed with these 26" wheel Schwinn offerings.

The one I picked up is no exception. The fenders were a bit crushed however they are now straight enough
to gauge a wheel to fender fit, and I could not help but to wonder about using 27" wheels...

Inspired by a member's opaque blue Collegiate shown with 27" inch S6 wheels (I saved a pic from the lost thread)
as well as being deterred by one member's assurance that it will not work...my attention soon fell on the fender strut lengths, and especially upon the L shaped bracket which supports each fender at the brake.

Looking across the shed at the three Suburbans, I see perfect fender to wheel alignment.
Looking at pictures of Collegiates I see all sorts of crookedness.

It seems the struts are very near the same length (probably are) between the 27" rim  Suburban and the
smaller wheel Collegiate. The reason the Collegiate fenders seem skewed in regard to the tire
would seem to be the frame brake strut positioning in rear, and a longer L bracket depending from the fork,
each of which positioning squash the fender downward 1/4" near the top of each tire...

Because the fender struts are as long on the 26" bike as they are on the 27" bike, the effect is
a crooked appearance on the Collegiate, which seems consistent in archived photos. Very few Collegiates
look all right and if they do it's likely because someone took the effort to shape the fender that way, by hand,
or luck of the frame build draw.

Conversely, very few Suburbans appear with misaligned fender to wheel fit.
If they do it is usually due to a crash, bends that were left unattended.

In short, it looks like the 27" wheel is a no go for the Collegiate. The ends (front and back) look like there is plenty of clearance, but up near that L clamp at each brake, it distorts downward and comes closest to the rubber there.
One would have to slot the hole so to get 1/4" maximum breathing room (or get the different L bracket as on a 27" model) and unless your fender is a perfect (semi) circle,
it will likely interfere with a 27" S6 tire.

I am fitting bare 27's if only to straighten the fender alignment problem,
but will start riding with the stock 26's, since they are straight and have good rubber,
as soon as I have some spokes. I need at most a dozen. Looks like some slotting of axle position
strut holes is in order as to draw in the fender ends, and to open up the area on top.
The plan is to make the fenders concentric.

I have read every thread I could find here, and am entertaining aftermarket sizes...700 or 26" Suns
as some members have suggested. Thus all fooling with brake reach and fender interference could be avoided,
and the bulky bike (baskets) could be lightened up a bit with the lighter wheels.

ETA looking at a 700 bolted up in front I've decided against that option.
The fender to wheel fit is just too non-concentric. The brakes look like they will not reach, a deciding factor.
I will run stock 26", perhaps later
find some similarly sized HD aluminum rims. With the low position BB set, generous fender clearances,
and some lightweight boxed rims, this could
become a decent low obstacle mud/trail bike or doomsday hauler.

ETA To each L shaped fender bracket attached at brake, I slotted for an additional 1/4" of height clearance.
Since the brake bolts were loose I cleaned up the fender area with a fine abrasive pad.

This 1/4 upward lift is maximum...the fender is now 'asymptotic' with the brake mount spine assembly,
front bracket just clears the fork hardware etc. Additionally, two washers now space the L bracket (rear fender) forward
by almost .100". The line of the fender circle is greatly improved.
With a small adjustment at the vertical strut mounting hole, these fenders are close to being truly concentric.

I am now convinced that 27" wheels would work, and be very closely gapped, evenly about the guards.
But I am staying with 26's. Stock for now...awaiting spoke repair, tune up. As others have noted: they weigh
a lot. They weigh more than 27s. I have a 26 on front, a 27 on rear (both bare) and the center of gravity
has shifted forward noticeably.

If it all gets too heavy, it could always be fitted with a boost.
Front wheel hub, shouldn't hurt a fork that's known to be stiff fore/aft...idk.