Author Topic: Pedaling Dreams: the Raleigh Story  (Read 349 times)

Offline rickpaulos

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Pedaling Dreams: the Raleigh Story
« on: March 16, 2017, 11:34:53 AM »
Great documentary on the history of Raleigh bikes.
watch before it gets yanked.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKitJUnHBeY&feature=youtu.be
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Offline Geezer

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Re: Pedaling Dreams: the Raleigh Story
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2017, 11:08:40 PM »
Great documentary on the history of Raleigh bikes.
watch before it gets yanked.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKitJUnHBeY&feature=youtu.be


 8)Thanks for sharing!  8)

I don't think you have to worry about the video getting yanked; it's published under standard YouTube license.

Even putting up with the intermittent audio track,which is only the first few minutes (it gets better), it's a fascinating documentary of Raleigh's century-and-a-half history in England.  A very entertaining and informative hour's watching! 

I particularly enjoyed the part about the introduction of the Chopper! 8)

According to this documentary, the Chopper was originally introduced in 1970.  So mine couldn't be a '69 model, as I'd been told!  :o    It also confirmed my belief that Raleigh had produced the Chopper as a direct response to Schwinn's StingRay,which was then being marketed in the UK as the Mustang.  That bike flopped in England, while the Chopper couldn't really compete with the StingRay in the US.

This video references a film, How A Bicycle Is Made, produced in 1945. Made to promote cycling, it celebrates Raleigh's post-war return to bicycle production after six long years, working three shifts continuously, making munitions and parts for the war effort.. 
(It's just under 25 minutes long).

 
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 05:41:18 AM by Geezer »
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Offline eastonlionel

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Re: Pedaling Dreams: the Raleigh Story
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2017, 06:21:39 AM »
Just watched the Raleigh story last night.  It seemed a bit odd that they made such a big deal about who designed the "chopper" when it was obviously a complete ripoff of the Stingray.  I mean, how imaginative is it to use the same style of wheels, handlebars, size of bike, and similar shift lever with the only difference being a boring straight tube frame rather than Schwinn's beautiful cantilever frame?   ???  The rest of it was quite interesting, especially all the pre-1970 history.
'53 Varsity, black enamel
'56 American manual 2 speed, opal green (men's) and opal blue (women's)
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Offline Geezer

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Re: Pedaling Dreams: the Raleigh Story
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2017, 07:21:09 AM »
Just watched the Raleigh story last night.  It seemed a bit odd that they made such a big deal about who designed the "chopper" when it was obviously a complete ripoff of the Stingray.  I mean, how imaginative is it to use the same style of wheels, handlebars, size of bike, and similar shift lever with the only difference being a boring straight tube frame rather than Schwinn's beautiful cantilever frame?   ???  The rest of it was quite interesting, especially all the pre-1970 history.

It's true that Raleigh's Chopper was a direct response to Schwinn's StingRay; however it would be a mistake to call it a "complete ripoff".  The Chopper was specifically designed to appeal to British taste with its straight frame, as well as to distinguish itself from the  curvaceous American Stingray.  As an aesthetic design, the Chopper was unique and revolutionary.  Schwinn, on the other hand, had simply copied what kids in California were doing at the time with their bikes,by adapting "Texas Longhorn" handlebars and Polo seats to the 20-inch Typhoon, which had been around for many years.

Source: NO HANDS:  The Rise and Fall of the Schwinn Bicycle Company, an American Institution
By Judith Crown and Glenn Coleman  (1996)





« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 08:37:34 AM by Geezer »
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